Who Would Jesus Shoot?

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On November 12, 2014, the Director of the McDonald Centre, Prof. Nigel Biggar, participated in a debateon the theological legitimacy of war entitled “Who Would Jesus Shoot?” with Dr. Thomas Yoder Neufeld, a Mennonite theologian and author of Jesus and the Subversion of Violence.

Around 160 people attended the event, which was held at Union Chapel in Bloomsbury, London, and chaired by Karen Stallard, minister at Union Chapel and a member of the Anabaptist Network steering committee, and Simon Barrow, co-director of the Christian political think-tank Ekklesia. One attendee reported that it was ‘the best, most constructive public conversation about peace and war from a Christian perspective that I think I’ve ever been part of.’

The two main addresses can be streamed here and downloaded here.

Making Sense of Life: Can War Be Justified?

St Andrews OxfordOn 16 November 2014, the Director of the McDonald Centre, Prof. Nigel Biggar, was interviewed at St. Andrew’s Church, Oxford, by Revd. Andrew Wingfield-Digby.  The interview was followed by an address in which the Director discussed his recent work on the moral and theological legitimacy of war with particular reference to the First World War and the current crisis in Syria and Iraq.

How Much Is Enough? Money and the Good Life

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On Friday 28 February 2014, the McDonald Centre will host a conference on How Much is Enough? In addition to the authors themselves, speakers will include Rowan Williams, the former Archbishop of Canterbury, John Lloyd of the Financial Times, and Martin Kettle of the Guardian.

The conference will take place at Christ Church in the Blue Boar Lecture Theatre, and will run from 0900 to 1600. Admission is free on a first-come, first-served basis.

NEW Seminar Programme

In 1930 John Maynard Keynes predicted that, over the next century, income would rise steadily, people’s basic needs would be met, and no one would have to work more than fifteen hours a week. Why was he so wrong?

In How Much is Enough? The Love of Money and the Case for the Good Life (Penguin, 2012 and 2013), Robert and Edward Skidelsky argue that wealth is not—or should not be—an end in itself, but rather a means to the good life. Observing how far modern life has strayed from that ideal, and rejecting the claim that there is any single measure of human well-being—whether GDP or ‘happiness’—they analyse the good life into seven elements, argue that a healthy liberal society should promote them, and propose a set of policies to realise them.